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FIVE QUESTIONS I RESPECTFULLY ASK, FIVE SOUTHERN BAPTIST CONVENTION ENTITIES TO ANSWER

BY WILLIAM DWIGHT MCKISSIC, SR.

Five Entities: Southern Baptist Executive Committee (EC), Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary (SWBTS), International Mission Board (IMB), New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary (NOBTS) and Lifeway.

There are five questions that I plan to forward to five SBC entities (listed above), who have hired, or will be hiring a President for each entity, in the months ahead. If I get actual, specific answers to these questions in writing before the Annual Session of the Southern Baptist Convention in Birmingham, in June, I will not find it necessary to ask these questions during each of these five entities’ report to the Convention. If I don’t get answers to these questions, I will feel compelled to ask these questions on the floor of the Convention.

  1. Will you please share with me the total number of minority applicants for the Presidency of the IMB, SWBTS, EC, NOBTS and Lifeway, by the date of this letter?
  2. Will you please share with me the total number of minority applicants that made the list of the top three finalist for the presidency of each entity (IMB, SWBTS, EC, NOBTS and Lifeway)?
  3. Will you please share with me the total number of minority applicants who were interviewed at each entity (IMB, SWBTS, EC, NOBTS and Lifeway)?
  4. Will each entity give your answer to the question that was reportedly expressed by a retiring entity head (that hopefully was simply an innocuous, objective and pragmatic question, as opposed to a racist question): Do you believe that a minority entity head would adversely affect the donor base of the SBC and her entities?
  5. Will you give your answer to the question regarding your comfortability and compatibility with numerous resolutions of the SBC expressing the aspirational goal of minority inclusion and empowerment at every level of SBC life: If there are no minorities hired as entity heads between now and the near future, is that philosophically and pragmatically, a picture and a reality that your entity would be comfortable with?

Thanks for your consideration and contribution of the answers to each of these five questions. The answers to the questions will be very helpful in understanding the diversity pool of SBC potential leadership, who has expressed an openness to serve our Convention. The answers will also provide valuable information needed to be proactive in recruiting minorities to apply for future vacancies. Finally, it will give trustee board members a scientific, statistical analysis of what progress is being made toward the SBC Great Commission Council, reflecting the diversity of the scope of the Great Commission. I am really grateful for your anticipated response/answers to these questions.

For His Kingdom,

William Dwight McKissic, Sr.

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TO ATTEND, OR NOT ATTEND, THAT IS THE QUESTION

by William Dwight McKissic, Sr.

I enjoy attending the Annual Session of the Southern Baptist Convention each year. Our annual Vacation Bible School and the second week of June SBC session have often conflicted on our church calendar. I have usually opted to attend the SBC, when that occurs, and left an Associate in charge. This year we scheduled the VBS for the last week of June, to make sure it didn’t conflict with the SBC and/or the National Baptist Congress of Christian Education meeting in Baltimore.

However, as of today, I’m seriously contemplating whether or not to attend the SBC Birmingham, 2019. Why? To be perfectly honest, I have conflicting emotions about the SBC’s commitment to giving Asians, Hispanics, and African Americans an opportunity to interview for, and be hired as one of the Presidents of the nine Southern Baptist entities.

My ambivalent feelings are not in any wise related to fellow Arkansan, Dr. Ronnie Floyd, being elected as President of the SBC Executive Board. I actually think Ronnie was a good choice, and I have every reason to believe that he will give the Kingdom and the SBC his absolute best. If God gives our Convention the favor under Ronnie’s leadership, that God gave to the Cross Church, Fayetteville, AR, where Dr. Floyd serves as pastor, we have a bright future ahead of us. My prayers and heart is for Kingdom advancement in the SBC over the next few years.

The election of Ronnie Floyd did bring to memory the controversy surrounding the letter forwarded to the EC nominating committee regarding whether or not a minority candidate was interviewed for the presidency of the EC. The EC Board of Trustees adamantly refused to answer the question, which indicated to me they had not interviewed a minority candidate. I know with certainty a highly qualified Black applicant, with a Ph.D. from a SBC seminary, experienced pastor, seminary professor, and an experienced State Executive Director, was not interviewed or seriously considered by the EC Search Committee. It is baffling to me, how do you deny such a qualified person an interview? I could accept the fact that the Committee may consider Dr. Floyd the better fit, or the more capable of the two…but to not even interview the minority candidate? BAFFLING!!!

I know for certain, a highly qualified Black candidate has submitted his name for the vacancy as President of Lifeway. At least two qualified Blacks submitted their resumes for the vacancy of the President of New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. Every applicant has an earned doctorate, two with Ph.D.’s, and extensive experience in SBC life. Yet, none of them currently are the leading candidates for the vacancies at any of these SBC entities. BAFFLING!!!

You will never convince me that out of five vacant entity head positions, it was God’s will in every instance for an Anglo to be selected. You will never convince me in a denomination that is comprised of a 20% minority population, and assigned to disciple the nations, that at every gathering of the Great Commission Council of the SBC, it should resemble the convening of The White Citizens Council.

If the SBC continues down this road of electing five White entity heads, in the most recent vacancies, the message being sent to minorities is: You can ride on the bus, but don’t ever expect to drive it.

Failing to interview, seriously consider and to hire minority candidates have left me with a feeling in the pit of my stomach that I may be a part of a denomination driven by systemic racism and a White Supremacy construct that simply cannot and will not empower and submit to minority leadership. Wrestling with this thought is very disconcerting for me.

Finally, I may not attend for a very practical reason. I’ve decided to re-enroll as a student at SWBTS to complete my Masters. I plan to take one class every semester, including the May Term, January Term, Summer semester, Fall and Spring, until I finish. Therefore, I may be in class this summer and simply need to be disciplined and focused. I had hoped to enroll in a class that would give me credit for attending the SBC Annual Convention, as some classes do.

I am really enjoying a Church History II class taught by Dr. Robert Caldwell. This semester we are required to read, “The Democratization of American Christianity” by Nathan O. Hatch. In Chapter six, “The Right to Think for Oneself,” Page 171, Hatch writes:

The anguish of injustice and poverty makes unacceptable the implication that God is ordaining, and taking pleasure in, whatever happens. African-Americans, for instance, found little place for pre-destination in their understanding of Christianity. In Wilkinson County, Mississippi, a slave gravedigger, with a younger helper, asked a white stranger a question:

“Massa, may I ask you something?”

“Ask what you please.”

“Can you ‘splain how it happened in the fust place, that the white folks got the start of the black folks, so as to make dem slaves and do all de work?”

The younger helper, fearing the white man’s wrath, broke in: “Uncle Pete, it’s no use talking. It’s fo’ordained. The Bible tells you that. The Lord fo’ordained the Nigger to work, and the white man to boss.”

Dat’s so. Dat’s so. But if dat’s so, then God’s no fair man!”

Hatch then concludes:

“The forms of Christianity that prospered among African-Americans were not accepting of the status quo. They supported a moral revulsion of slavery and promised eventual deliverance, putting God on the side of change and freedom.”

God is on the side of change and freedom. It is time for the SBC to change. If the SBC does not change in this cycle of entity hiring, when will she change? Will she ever change? I am not sure of the answers to these questions.

Like the older slave in the above story, I just have this question: Why is it that a minority can’t ever lead an SBC entity? Is it fore ordained? God forbid! But what I do know, I cannot get excited about attending a convention where I have to ask these questions, because repeatedly I see the white power structure leave my people only with questions, but no answers.

To attend, or not attend, that is the question. At the moment, I remain uncertain.

 

WARNING ALWAYS COMES BEFORE JUDGMENT

Reflections on Recent SBC Sexual Abuse Reports

By William Dwight McKissic, Sr.

Christa Brown of StopBaptistPredators.org has been sounding the alarm for many years that there was a major problem, widespread, among Southern Baptists regarding sexual abuse. Unfortunately, she was largely marginalized, rebuffed, rejected, and her claims were met with denial, by high profile SBC personalities and official entity responses. History has vindicated her. The recent Houston Chronicle article documents and details a pattern of sexual abuse and cover-ups in SBC Life. Ms. Brown actually deserves an apology from the personalities and entities that questioned her motives and veracity.

In 2010, my heart bled for how the SBC was treating Ms. Brown (https://baptistnews.com/article/church-honors-advocate-for-abuse-victims/#.XGXDm1VKiM8). I wanted to encourage and affirm her, and let her know that, I, for one, thought her story was authentic, and her claims were valid that there was a larger problem in SBC Life regarding this issue.

God always sends warning before judgment. The SBC ignored the warning from the “prophetess”—Christa Brown. Now, the SBC is facing judgment.

Another warning: Sherri Klouda, Karen Bullock, and Wendy Norvelle are three SBC women who were all mistreated professionals in SBC institutional life. They were all denied tenure, positions, demoted or fired, simply because they were women. The same conservative, inerrantist, trustee board that hired Sherri Klouda to teach the Hebrew alphabet at SWBTS, fired her because she was a woman teaching the Hebrew alphabet. Sherri Klouda’s firing was inexcusable and indefensible. Yet, SWBTS did so, unapologetically. It is no secret that SWBTS is experiencing major enrollment decline and financial challenges. Judgment for the ill treatment of Sherri Klouda and denying Dr. Karen Bullock, tenure, may have already begun.

I would hope that SWBTS/SBC does not wait for a secular newspaper to document and detail all the women who have been professionally violated and mistreated in SBC Life before they repent, lament, and declare a change of heart, leading to a change of actions.

Wendy Norvelle was appointed Interim VP at IMB. But trustees would not support a woman being permanently named to such a position, although there is nothing scripturally that forbids a woman functioning in such a capacity. Junia, Phoebe, Huldah, Deborah, Priscilla and Lydia are excellent biblical role models that would have not been allowed to function in today’s SBC, because of views toward women, out of sync with Scripture. The three SBC women were serving in roles analogous with their biblical role models; yet, the SBC denied these women.

I, for one, want to go on record, again, acknowledging the SBC’s complicity and guilt in the maltreatment of Sherri Klouda, Karen Bullock, and Wendy Norvelle. I pray that the powers that be in the SBC would offer an apology to these women before judgment fully comes.

In 2007, I resigned as a trustee after serving for only one year for several reasons. Included were health concerns, church leadership and my wife’s feeling as if I had been rejected by the trustees and SWBTS leadership; therefore, I could not be effective as a trustee; and Cornerstone needed, respected and appreciated my time and input, more so than SWBTS. In many respects, when SWBTS leadership recommended to the SBC that I be removed as a trustee, they were attempting to silence and marginalize me, just as they had done Sherri Klouda and Karen Bullock. Later, they recanted their recommendation and asked me to remain a trustee. By then, I was exasperated. Those factors did weigh heavily upon my thinking. But an underlying factor, that I have never expressed publicly before was, I did not feel comfortable serving on a board that could treat Sherri Klouda as she was treated without any repentance or remorse. My presence on the board made me complicit; in my conscience, I could not live with that thought. Therefore, I resigned.

The same mentality that says Sherri Klouda cannot teach Hebrew, Wendy Norvelle cannot be a VP at IMB and Karen Bullock cannot teach church history or speak in Chapel—all on the basis of gender—is the same mentality that devalues women, solely on the basis of gender and contributes to a mentality of abusing women, because they are viewed as less valuable. God, forgive us and grant us mercy as you give us space to repent (Revelation 2:20-23).

Just as sexual abuse is systemic in SBC Life, denying women professional opportunities outside of the role of senior pastor is also systemic in SBC Life; and…God is displeased with both practices in the SBC.

In January, my wife and I have re-enrolled as students at SWBTS. We are enjoying every second of it. But, I pray that the day will come that apologies are extended to Dr. Klouda and Dr. Bullock before judgment comes.

 Church honors advocate for abuse victims

NEWSABPNEWS  |  DECEMBER 7, 2010

ARLINGTON, Texas (ABP) — A sometimes-controversial black Southern Baptist preacher recently honored an also-outspoken advocate for victims of sex abuse by Baptist clergy.

Dwight McKissic and Christa Brown

Dwight McKissic, pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas, presented Christa Brown of StopBaptistPredators.org with an award Nov. 21 for sacrificial service by a Christian woman.

The Phoebe Award is named for a woman mentioned in the Book of Romans as “a servant of the church” and “helper of many.” McKissic’s church gives it to a woman “who has made a difference in our world” or “someone who stands up for truth and right,” said Veronica Griffin, Cornerstone’s minister of communications and special events. She said the award is presented every three to five years.

Brown is former Baptist outreach director for the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, a support-and-advocacy group formed in 1989 in response to Catholic pedophilia scandals but with a focus that has expanded in recent years to clergy sexual abuse in other denominations. Brown tells her personal story of sexual abuse at the hands of a Baptist youth minister when she was a teenager — and of decades later tracking the perpetrator down and finally getting him removed from the ministry — in a book titled This Little Light.

After hearing from others with similar experiences, Brown set out to pressure the Southern Baptist Convention to set up safeguards like an independent panel where individuals could report abuse and a database of ministers guilty or credibly accused of sexual abuse.

For her efforts Brown and other leaders of SNAP have been publicly branded by prominent SBC leaders as “evil doers,” “just as reprehensible as sex criminals” and “nothing more than opportunistic persons who are seeking to raise opportunities for personal gain.”

Time magazine ranked the Southern Baptist Convention’s refusal to create a database of child molesters one of the 10 most under-reported stories of 2008. More recently a review of Brown’s book appeared overseas in The Times Literary Supplement. A translation just out in the Paris publication Booksmagazine carries the headline, “L’Église baptiste, paradis des pedophiles,” French for, “The Baptist church, paradise for pedophiles.”

A Cornerstone Baptist Church press release said Brown “works tirelessly to protect the next generation of innocent girls from abuse by Baptist pastors and clergy.”

“Although Ms. Brown has been disrespected, shunned and treated harshly by some in the Baptist family, she has chosen to take her abuse, hurt and shame and turn it into an opportunity to protect other women and girls from the same abuse, hurt and shame,” the release continued. “Realizing that not all Baptist preachers are predators, Ms. Brown desires to make parents aware of predators while educating the parent to become more aware and savvy in protecting their children.”

“She deserves to receive dignity, honor and acknowledgment for her life’s mission to protect others from clergy sexual abuse and change the Baptist infrastructure so that children and families are safe,” the release concluded.

Brown, an appellate lawyer now pursuing a Ph.D. at Iliff School of Theology in Denver, said that traveling to Texas to accept the award was the first time — except for funerals — she had set foot in a Baptist church in more than 30 years.

“I am grateful to the people of Cornerstone Baptist Church and to Rev. Dwight McKissic for the message of hope they have sent in the making of this award,” Brown said. “Like many other clergy sex-abuse survivors, I yearn for a day when kids in Baptist churches will be a great deal safer, and when abuse survivors will be heard with compassion and care.”

“As Dr. McKissic so wisely recognizes, the work of protecting against clergy predators is not work that attacks the church but work that seeks to serve the church,” she said.

“Though the stories of clergy sex abuse survivors may be deeply troubling, in truth, we bring a gift to the faith community. Our stories may serve to illuminate the care that is needed for the faith community itself, so that Baptists may bear a more faithful witness in the world and may become more true to their own vision of who they are.”

McKissic is no stranger to controversy. He was forced to resign as a trustee at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary after saying in a chapel sermon that he uses a “private prayer language,” a practice common among Pentecostal and charismatic groups but controversial for many Southern Baptists.

More recently McKissic proposed amending the Southern Baptist Convention’s constitution to exclude churches that support “racial discrimination and bigotry in any form” and called for a resolutionapologizing for the convention’s mistreatment of women.

-30-

Bob Allen is senior writer for Associated Baptist Press.

DEMOCRATS ARE CALLED “GODLESS” AND ARE BEING QUESTIONED ABOUT THE INTEGRITY OF THEIR FAITH

By William Dwight McKissic, Sr.

It’s interesting that Democrats are being questioned about the integrity of their faith, from Republican loyalists who elected a man who own casinos, strip joints, thrice married, engaged in multiple affairs while married, who will not answer the question whether or not he paid for an abortion, defends taking children from their mothers at the border, and announced at the outset of his candidacy that he would not try and overturn the sanctioning of same-sex marriage.

The truth of the matter is that the Democrats demonstrate a greater reflection of Christ’s Kingdom on issues of providing a safety net for the poor, immigration reform, social and economic justice and equality, fairness and policy brutality issues.

The Republicans provide a greater reflection of Christ’s Kingdom on issues regarding the sanctity of life and their platform position against gay marriage.

I’m neither Republican nor a Democrat. The Kingdom of God does not ride on the back of a donkey or an elephant. Jesus did not come to take sides; He came to take over. I’m solely on the side of the Lamb who is worthy. The Donkey and the Elephant both fall short of the Kingdom of God, by a long shot. To tout one party spiritually and morally superior to the other, is divisive and alienating to the vast majority of believers who tend to vote along party lines racially. The implications racially of labeling Democrats “godless” are staggering.

Such false, misleading, and ill-thought labeling places the vast majority of Black and Hispanic evangelicals in the category of “godless.” It is very painful and offensive to be labeled “godless” by a people who elected a person who prefers immigrants from Norway over African immigrants and refers to the alt-right as “very fine people.”

My Comment Concerning the Decision to Post My 2006 Sermon in the Online Archives of SWBTS
by William Dwight McKissic, Sr.
The spirit on Southwestern’s campus this week has been one of repentance, reconciliation, and renewal. I do not know all the factors that went into the seminary’s decision to make my 2006 sermon available online after more than twelve years of censure. I am grateful for that decision, and it could not have come at a more perfect time. My family and my church have always been supportive of Southwestern Seminary. We will continue to be as the Lord gives us health and strength.

A PLEA TO THE SENATE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE TO TREAT DR. CHRISTINE BLASEY FORD WITH FAIRNESS, DECENCY AND RESPECT

By William Dwight McKissic, Sr.

How Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is treated by the Senate as a woman who confesses that she was victimized by Brett Kavanaugh during their high school years is not a matter of politics, from my perspective. It is a moral, justice, ethical, due process, and gender-fair treatment matter. I am equally as concerned that Supreme Court nominee, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, receives the same equal and fair treatment by the Senate and the process, related to Dr. Ford’s accusations against him.

Because elections have consequences, and I am passionately pro-life, I am not among those who hope that Dr. Ford’s accusations would derail the Kavanaugh nomination. My heart would rejoice if Judge Kavanaugh casts the decisive vote to overturn Roe v. Wade. My purpose in addressing this issue is simply to add another voice to those who are concerned that Dr. Ford receives the utmost respect, fairness, and justice from the Senate regarding how her case is handled, by the powers that be.

I am deeply concerned by the Senate’s unwillingness to require a FBI investigation, and depositions be taken on all related parties involved in Dr. ford’s attempted-rape allegations against Judge Kavanaugh.

Two of the senators currently serving on the Senate Judiciary Committee also served on the Committee during the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill saga. Those senators requested FBI investigation/depositions then, but are not in favor of FBI investigations/depositions on the Kavanaugh /Ford accusations. This speaks hypocrisy and duplicity.

References to Dr. Ford being confused, a pawn, and unreliable because she did not report this matter to the law at the time of the alleged occurrence, by President Trump and Republican Senators have been disheartening, because it demonstrates a certain insensitivity and indifference to Dr. Ford—and by extension—women victims. These kinds of dubious and ill-informed expressions by political figures in high places are beneath the dignity of their offices. Those comments do not bode well that she will be judged fairly and impartially.

Therefore, my plea is for the Senate Judiciary Committee and President Trump to demonstrate to the world, America’s value, respect, and due process rights, to all of her citizens including women who bring accusations against, powerful men.

Judge Kavanaugh’s due process rights and fair and respectable treatment are not in question. But, if from Democrats or anyone else tempted to demonstrate a lack of fairness, due process, disrespect or male bashing toward Judge Kavanaugh, my plea is the same: Let’s demonstrate to the world the greatness of America by conducting the Ford/Kavanaugh hearings, with decency, dignity, and cross-gender fairness, respect, and equality. America, our daughters and the women of the world are watching. Let all things be done decently and in order.

A Book Review by William Dwight Mckissic, Sr.

GOD’S AMAZING GRACE:  RECONCILING FOUR CENTURIES OF AFRICAN AMERICAN MARRIAGES AND FAMILIES

Author – PASTOR TERRY TURNER

A response to a question Blacks have been asked for years, is finally answered in this great book of epic insights by Terry Turner entitled, God’s Amazing Grace:  Reconciling Four Centuries of African American Marriages and Families. “Why don’t you just get over it,” is a question many non-Blacks often ask of African Americans, in regards to any civil rights matter. For most Blacks, the answer is not a simple reply because it is so complex. In this book, Turner does an excellent job of breaking down the issues in the Black community that have stifled growth and positive outcomes in their marriages and families. He even begins the book as an African American male addressing the question to his race, asking, “What is wrong with my people?” As I read the book, my mind began to categorize into four different sections that may be helpful to the reader. For me, the book can be broken down, to help answer these questions, into the foundation of the problems, fatherlessness being at the forefront of the issues, faith being a saving grace for what is to remain of the family structure, and remedies to build the future.

Looking at a newly constructed building, one may notice wooden planks holding a temporary structure in place that workers stand on while building the permanent edifice. These beams however, will not remain once the building is completed. They simply are put in place to help build the foundation until the building can stand on its own. This practice is called scaffolding. In African American families, scaffolding came in the form of people who did not have their best interest in mind. The Black family foundation is built on lies and deceit, and therefore is an imbalanced entity, comparably speaking. Turner addresses The Trickle Down Effect, Post-Traumatic Slavery Syndrome, mistreatment of prisoners and slaves and even sexual abuse as defects in the foundation of Black homes. His research is eye opening to its readers and will shed much light on the many many cracks in the foundation of the Black family structure.

Every child’s first hero usually lives in their house and sleeps with them each night. This idol protects them from harm, provides a place of stability and makes sure they never go to bed hungry. He can even be responsible for ensuring they are educated and a well-rounded member of society. They go by the endearing name, Daddy. A dad is born into a family as a son and is groomed to one day assume the position of the patriarch. In the Black family, this position is often left void. Whether the father has been killed at an early age, died of natural causes, or just chose not to be in the child’s life, absenteeism is a true problem that plagues the foundation of many Black homes. Turner even expresses his personal situation where his father lived in his home but was still absent emotionally and eventually physically due to medical issues. Some fathers live in the home but due to drug abuse, extra marital relationships, and other setbacks, they still do not engage with their children and wife in a positive manner. All of these hardships have made it difficult for Black families to thrive. Without being taught how to be a superhero, how exactly does one learn? Even Robin had Batman to show him the way. Often times, young boys grow up to be men raising families of their own, with not a single instruction from their Batman. The early example of masculine leadership in the Black families was slave masters beating, raping and deceiving families to follow instructions that were necessary for their survival. With this treacherous way of living as the introduction to fatherhood in the African American family, it comes as no surprise to people of color why their homes are unstable in comparison to their white counterparts.

As with any damage structure, hope remains that it can be restored. The African American family is no different. For centuries, it has been faith in Christ that has held the Black family together. This faith is well documented in how it helped slaves maintain their livelihood and even escape. This faith was an outlet to the troubles that continued into the civil rights movement. Many African American pastors have been at the forefront of social injustices, as Blacks use their faith as a pathway to freedom and rely on their spiritual advisors to lead them.

Moving through history and into the current century, marriages in the African American families have evolved and albeit a struggle, the integrity of marriage must be maintained to ensure strong families in the future. Imagine being stripped from a husband and kids and being forced into adultery, fornication and even incestuous relationships against your will. This was the plight of most African American women in slavery. While not even classified as a human, these women were defenseless and unable to protect themselves. Turner points out that contrary to the scriptures they were taught on sexual immorality, they were not given the chance to abstain. For these reasons, families were completely mutilated and scattered. Presently, some of these ill effects still haunt Black families. Sexual sins are not always viewed as such, because for years, under the law, incontinence, fornication, adultery, bigamy and other sexual crimes, were not considered as such for slaves and Blacks. Fast forward to 2018, many of these acts still exist and are rampant in Black homes. Now that marriages are legal and laws are in place to protect the sanctity of marriage, Blacks must take advantage of the opportunity and stop destroying their families due to sexual misconduct.

By God’s Amazing Grace, there is hope for the Black family in America. With excuses that can run four centuries long, it is imperative that African Americans rid their families of these cracks in their foundation. “Just get over it! What is wrong with my people? What is wrong with me?” The answer: Nothing. Our past has been reconciled and by His Grace, our families will be healed.

Terry Turner has done an excellent with this awesome work, “God’s Amazing Grace:  Reconciling Four Centuries of African American Marriages and Families.” The content of his message is relatable to the needs of the African American Community concerning the issues we face today. This book about God’s Amazing Grace engages and equips all people concerning African American families and history. Terry Turner is a compelling and persuasive teacher/preacher. I endorse and highly recommend “God’s Amazing Grace:  Reconciling Four Centuries of African American Marriages and Families.” It is a really great read! I believe you will be blessed, encouraged and greatly benefited by reading Turner’s book.

 

William Dwight McKissic, Sr.
Pastor, Cornerstone Church, Arlington, TX

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